Questions

&
Answers......Page 82

puzzlehistory.com
Click on small images to see larger images.
Click on the "BACK" button to return.
ESCAPE FROM FRAMES

[1296]from "PB"--9 July 2004:
I have a puzzle that show a Royal Canadian Mountie on horseback with a Metis scout following him. The title is "The Silver Eagle Mountie, Sgt. Jim West and his friend "Joe Bideaux." In lower right hand corner is a small box that says (c) Jewell Radio and Television Productions. Can you tell me if this puzzle was based on a radio/television show or both. Also, can you give me a time period and maybe where to get information on the program. Thank you.
"PB"
***************
from Jim McW--12 July 2004:
We did a search and found a bit of information about a James Jewell, who apparently was involved in radio production of " The Lone Ranger " , " The Green Hornet " , " Jack Armstrong, All-American Boy ", and " Silver Eagle ".
Can anyone tell us more about " The Silver Eagle " ?
Jim McW
***************
from "JM"--20 August 2006:
The show was a favorite of mine, though now dimly remembered, from the early '50's. There were a couple of Mountie shows about then that were, no doubt, inspired by the success of _Challenge of the Yukon_ with Sgt. Preston. As I recall Mountie West, for some reason, favored a bow and arrow and the show began with the sound of an arrow being fired, in flight and striking a target, which always sounded to me, as a child, very much like our rear screen door being opened and being pulled forcefully shut by the attached spring.
"JM"
***************
from Jim McW--21 August 2006:
We have been able to discover that the hero of the show was Jim West (Silver Eagle), and his sidekick was Joe Bideaux.
Can anyone add to this story?
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
from Jim McW--18 November 2006:
We have received this photo of an old Silver Eagle puzzle:
Silver Eagle Mountie" Silver Eagle Mountie ", MILTON BRADLEYTM, frame tray puzzle [early 1050's?]
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1297]from "PV"--13 July 2004:
Your web site is very enlightening. I am trying to locate a puzzle of the signing of The Declaration of Independence by the artist John Trumbull. I do not know who the manufacturer was, perhaps Tuco, Whitman etc? Our family spent many hours during the 1940's doing that puzzle over and over again. I would like to locate a puzzle. Can you help me out?
"PV"
***************
from Jim McW--14 July 2004:
Our files show a number of versions of this work, including:
Signing the Declaration of Independence "Signing the Declaration of Independence", by John Trumbull, by J.S. Publishing (1940's),
a Perfect Picture edition (1940's), and a later edition by Fairchild, in their U.S. Bicentennial Series (1970's).
There is also a Tuco entitled "Signing [of] the Constitution", by Howard Chandler Christy ; and
Percy Moran's work, Celebrating the Signing of the Declaration of Independence
"Celebrating the Signing of the Declaration of Independence"
has appeared in several editions, including this Whitman Guild.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1298]from "LJ"--14 July 2004:
you have a great site...but didn't find anything about the Milton Bradley Millennium 1000 piece puzzles in tins.
I have two of them....1900-40's and 1950-70's....did they make another one for 1980-2000?

Thanks!
"LJ"
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1299]from "AM"--15 July 2004:
Jim

I have two Lone Wolf pictures---Both are looking over a town,at night and in winter. One wolf is looking left,the other is looking right.Are they both by the same painter,who is he,does he have more paintings?
"AM"
***************
from Jim McW--17 July 2004:
If you had done a search on our SEARCH page, you would have found at least one example of this work in a puzzle, along with the name of the artist, Alfred von Kowalski-Wierusz. See Chris McCann's book,Master Pieces: the Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles for more information about this prolific artist.
As for the wolf looking left and looking right, the same image has simply been used in original and reversed orientations, I would imagine.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
from Jim McW--19 July 2004:
Upon reflection (and further search in our files), I found records of the two, very similar paintings, one by von Kowalski-Wierusz, the other by Borin.
Jim McW
***************
from Chris McCann--20 July 2004:
Hi Jim:
Kowalski-Wierusz is the artist and Borin is the lithographer and owner of the copyright.
Chris
***************
from Jim McW--20 July 2004:
There is (apparently) two different versions, one with the wolf facing left, the other with the wolf facing right.
Jim McW
***************
from Chris McCann--21 July 2004:
Hi Jim:
I have not seen the two different versions of Lone Wolf. Reverse images are common, and in the 19th Century, when there were no copy machines available, an artist often painted the same scene more than once, if it was a popular subject. For example, if several people at an exhibition offered to buy a particular painting, the artist often obliged by painting enough copies of it to satisfy the demand. Also, popular paintings were copied by other aspiring artists. R Atkinson Fox copied a number of 19th Century paintings and adopted the scenes as his own.
Chris
***************
from Jim McW--25 July 2004:
I finally found time to provide illustrations of both versions:
--LOOKING LEFT--     --LOOKING RIGHT--
The Lone Wolf The Lone Wolf
"The Lone Wolf"

Thanks, Jim McW
***************
from Jim McW--1 August 2004:
Chris McCann comments, "The Wolf on the right appears to be a copy made by an unknown artist using the original as a theme.
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1300]from "KH"--15 July 2004:
Howdy,

I am new to the fun hobby of puzzle collecting. I tend to gravitate toward those puzzles that I had while growing up. There's one in particular that I have been searching for like crazy. Someone suggested that it sounded like a Springbok, but I honestly don't know. Maybe you can help.

The puzzle dates from the early to mid 1980's. It came in a brown colored box, with the image taking over most of the cover. The image was spooky...it looked like someone took a photograph of a dark corner of a basement or attic. There are rough looking wood beams that form the cradle for a bunch of antique time pieces that are in various states of disrepair.
Cobwebs...thick white gobs of them, cover many of the time pieces. This creepy puzzle was one I'll never forget... the title was "Forgotten Time."

Have you ever heard of this? I looked through some Springbok listings to no avail. I'm hoping the description alone might spark someone somewhere...

Thanks!
"KH"
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1301]from "CT"--17 July 2004:
Hi,
I...thought you might want some...pictures for the site...brand mentioned in your Q&A section Page 33 - The Underground Jigsaw Puzzle - as a brand you hadn't heard of.:
Cowtown by Quay"Cowtown by Quay", The Underground Jigsaw Puzzle Company, more than 550 pieces.

Also, one included on your site, under Warren puzzles
Citadel"Citadel", by Kirwan, AMERICAN PUBLISHING COMPANYTM 500 pieces, unknown date.
Citadel"Citadel", by Kirwan, AMERICAN PUBLISHING COMPANYTM and ROSE ARTTM 500 pieces, 1994.
"KH"
***************
from Jim McW--18 July 2004:
The enquirer refers to no. 466, Page 33.
Can anyone confirm that AMERICAN PUBLISHING COMPANYTM and ROSE ARTTM are affiliated?
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
from Nancy Ballhagen, MISSOURIPUZZLE.COM--19 October 2004:
Yes, American Publishing was part of Warren Industries when Rose Art took over.
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1302]from "SM"--17 July 2004:
Hi:

Only started doing jigsaws again after about a 20 year hiatus. While staying with my dad in the hospital, I almost completed a 100 piece Whitman Guild Milton Bradley puzzle dated from mid 90's . I liked the variety of the pieces and that many adjacent pieces didn't have sides of exactly the same length; those pieces had adjacent sides with overhang.

When I flew back home , I decided to get a 2000 piece Ravensburger. Very disappointed. The adjacent pieces' side lengths matched exactly. Also all the pieces were the typical box and oblong shape.

According to your site under Best Puzzles, you list a lot of very old puzzles as your favorites; the older the better. One customer comment stated that the American made puzzles had the variety and challenge in pieces I was looking for, and Euro puzzles usually don't.

Are there any contemporary puzzle makers that make puzzles with variety and challenge? One user commented on companies such as Sunsout, Buffalo Games, Springbok, Ceaco, etc. Do you agree?

At the local Toys R US, they have some Big Ben Milton Bradley puzzles and a company called Serendipity. Wonder if they fit the bill. I plan on getting a Springbok from a hallmark Gold Crown store. had read good things about them.

Great site and I appreciate the effort.

Thanks

"SM"
***************
from Jim McW--18 July 2004:
Everybody has different tastes. This is true in jigsaw puzzles, as in anything else in life. Some people prefer the pieces to look as much alike as possible. It is possible to buy a puzzle in which the pieces are all the same color and almost the same sizes and shapes! You ( and we have the same personal preference) like the puzzles in which the pieces have different shapes. Among the brands which have cuts we like are: SPRINGBOKTM , CEACOTM, HOYLETM , NORDEVCOTM, WADDINGTONTM , EATONTM, as well as many of the old lines of the thirties and forties. Unfortunately, some of these companies no longer produce puzzles.
Since we enjoy almost all jigsaw puzzles, we simply try one or more of each kind. If we find a particular brand, company, or series more enjoyable, we will look for more of that kind of puzzle.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1303]from "JO1"--17 July 2004:
Hello, my sister recently moved to another state. Shortly after, while doing a puzzle on the dining room table, one of her new neighbors came to introduce himself. When he saw the puzzle on the table he mentioned that he also enjoys them. They he told my sister that she was cheating because she had started from the outside edge and also because she was using the picture on the box as a guide. Are there rules for jigsaw puzzles? Thank you in advance for your guidance.
"JO1"
***************
from Jim McW--18 July 2004:
This is a subject very close to my heart. My wife won't let me use the guide picture, for that very reason. All I can say is.... Where does it say that in the Rule Book !! (But don't tell my wife I said so.)
Seriously, one could make up any number of rules for working puzzles. For instance, one could make it a rule in assembling jigsaw puzzles, to complete each element first, before going to the next element....say, first the boat, then the sea, then the clouds, then the blue sky, then the jetty, and so forth....
The bottom line is, let the participants enjoy themselves. It may require some compromise, or give and take. For instance, if your sister were working on a puzzle with someone who doesn't believe in using the guide picture, she may decide to agree with the other person not to study the guide picture. That doesn't necessarily prevent her from accidentally glancing at the guide picture as she is tidying the table, while that person is in the kitchen for a moment, does it ?
From an historical point of view, jigsaw puzzles rarely had any kind of guide picture until some time in the late 1930's. By the 1940's, virtually all puzzles had guide pictures.
Another advantage to learning not to depend on the guide picture is that one is not daunted by a rare puzzle acquired without a box. We have purchased quite a few puzzles from the 1920's, 1930's, and later, for which the original box had been lost. Most of them turned out to be complete, but we had no guide pictures, so our usual method came in handy.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1304]from "BR"--18 July 2004:
I just picked up a few puzzles and I'd like to know if they are worth anything. Let's start with an FAO Schwarz in the box
Milk for Pep" Milk for Pep ". I also have about 5 more puzzles, I'm finding out that they are all wood and all very old, in great shape.
thank you
"BR"
***************
from Jim McW--18 July 2004:
As we frequently advise our visitors, we do not offer appraisals. We do have a brief discussion of values on our FAQ page. If you do a search on our SEARCH PAGE, you will probably find a number of other discussions of the subject, in various contexts, interspersed over our rather large site. Basically, it's impossible to predict what a puzzle will "be worth". I can say that old, wooden puzzles, complete and in good condition, are likely to sell well, and they are very collectible.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1305]from "BW"--18 July 2004:
I just received a hand-me-down puzzle certified 1912. I am trying to determine the value. It is a "History Picture Puzzle" by Parker Brothers, with a scene of a "colonial family with father leaving for battle. The signature on the corner is "copyright - John Ward Dunsmore - 1906.

Any help here would be appreciated.
Thanx
"BW"
***************
from Jim McW--18 July 2004:
See our comments in no. 1304, just above, as to value.
We are not familiar with the particular series to which your puzzle belongs. You don't say whether it is cardboard or wooden. Can you provide a picture? That would help us to date it, probably.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1306]from "DH"--21 July 2004:
Hi! This is my first visit to your website and I must say, I am impressed! I've been doing jigsaws for about 16 years. I took up the hobby shortly after I quit drinking. It has been the best decision of my life. My subject matter is CATS-domestic...as I have 16 of my own-yes! 16 of the little darlings.
I saw your suggestion regarding the glueing together of your finished project and would like to add to that if I may. I glue all of my puzzles together. The size of the puzzle determines how many "coats" of glue I apply. When it has dried completely, I then put a coat or two of Polyurethane on them, thus giving each one that "glossy" look. I have "been there and done that" when it comes to trying different ways of applying the glue n' glossy and, in my opinion, the best thing to use are the black foam sponges on handles-if you will. The cheap "imitations" are NO GOOD-they don't last as long as these do. The black ones can be rinsed and reused a number of times before you have to toss them. Now with the polyurethane-it's a "one time" use. So, I usually make sure I have quite a lot of puzzles to do -that way I get my money's worth. The sponges don't leave any marks either-like a brush does. I use "TACKY" glue for my puzzles because it is very thick and can be thinned to the consistency you like. It dries quickly and clearly and in 16 years I've never had a puzzle come "unglued". With this thicker glue, you get a lot more for your money.
My walls are covered with my puzzles (at last count I had completed a few more than 400). I have no problem starting and finishing a 1000 piece puzzle in 7-8 hours. I think that's better known as "addiction"!!! Puzzles are great on my walls as I live in California, near the fault line. My "pictures" don't crash and break during an earthquake - no matter how big it may be.
While doing my puzzles, I can shut out all other interference. Life itself is similar to a puzzle. We move along , putting all the pieces together until we have a clear picture of the situation. I pack boxes as tho' they were puzzles. I amaze people with the amount of "stuff" I am able to get into a box, a car, or whatever.
Well, unfortunately, I don't have the hours needed to view your entire site but know this, I will be returning and soon. I only wish I had found you sooner - would have saved myself LOTS of hours of "surfing"...
from "DH", a puzzlin' fool
Thanx
"DH"
***************
from Jim McW--25 July 2004:
Thanks for all the kind words of encouragement. And many thanks on behalf of all those who may benefit from your advice. This one goes on our STORIES page, too. We will mention it on our FAQ page, as well, for those who are looking for information about gluing, mounting, and framing.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1307]from "DE"--25 July 2004:
Hi,
Thanks for providing such a great website for information. In the late 50's and early 60's, I put together two puzzles by an artist named John Rogers, titled "Rural Winter" and "Peaceful Village". I've recently found Tuco versions of both these puzzles, but I believe my original copies were by Whitman Guild, 304 pieces. Is there any way to verify whether they produced copies of these puzzles? I've also recently found a puzzle by John Rogers, titled "The Red Barn" from approximately the same time that is a Whitman Guild Series E puzzle, if that's of any assistance. Thanks for any help you can provide.
"DE"
***************
from Jim McW--25 July 2004:
We are aware of the following puzzles with art by John Rogers:
" Watermill ", WHITMAN GOLD SEALTM
" Church Road ", WHITMAN GUILDTM
" The Red Barn ", WHITMAN GUILDTM
" The Red Barn ", TUCOTM
" Rural Winter ", TUCOTM
" Peaceful Village ", TUCOTM
" Peaceful Village ", WHITMAN GOLD SEALTM
Does anybody know of any others? Any other info on John Rogers?
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1308]from "SH"--25 July 2004:
Hi: I would love to know the name of a Wysocki puzzle...#4679-13. When I look at your list the description doesn't fit the titles. The item I'm looking for is a snow scene. Ideas?
Thanks,
"SH"
***************
from Jim McW--26 July 2004:
That number would correspond to:
Set 1 - " Plumbelly’s Playground " (1989)
Set 2 - " Reading and Riding " (1997) [from painting, "Fireside Companions"]
Set 3 - " Cat Nap "
Set 4 - " Ice Cream & Hopscotch " (2002) (Reissued Set 1 #16)
Set 5 - " Lilac Point Glen ", (2003) (Recropped Set 3 #23 with a new name)

The only one of these which involves snow in the scene seems to be Plumbelly's Playground, from 1989-1990 (the first set).
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1309]from "B40"--31 July 2004:
I have a fond memory of a particular jigsaw puzzle when I was a kid. Probably around 1960- 1963. The pic was of several wild horses running along a sand beach with a stormy sky background. Can you direct me on how to possibly find that particular puzzle? I am not sure who made puzzles back then. Can you help or lead me in the right direction?
"B40"
***************
from Jim McW--1 August 2004:
That sure sounds familiar. None of these are likely to be the one you're looking for, but I'll mention them:
Running Horses"Running Horses", by CLEMENTONITM
Copper Queen"Copper Queen", by Ruth Ray, WHITMAN GOLD SEAL No. 525. [title and artist supplied by Chris McCann]
There's also a painting by August Albo, entitled " Free as the Wind ". Can anyone further identify the puzzle in question?
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1310]from Jim McW--7 August 2004:
We received a letter from "LB", expressing bepuzzlement at not being able to find no. 1293, which we had cited as having a clarification of the question of finding the cat in a Heronim puzzle.
It turned out that we had made several errors:
First, the number should have been 1292 !
Secondly, we inadvertently dropped two or three entries from Page 81 for a few days. We have put them back, so, if you're looking for the cat, see No. 1292, Page 81.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1311]from "HG"--6 August 2004:
Hi,
I believe I have searched your entire site and others but can not find the answer to a particular question I have about a Jaymar Puzzle I bought at an Estate Sale. One question I found on your site said the Jaymar Specialty Co. which made the particular puzzle asked about was located on 200 Fifth Avenue in New York, N.Y and another site that pertained to Jaymar Toys and Puzzles has the Jaymar Specialty Co. located in Brooklyn, NY. This site also says that Jaymar went out of business in 1990.
My question is, I have a Norman Rockwell Puzzle (Henry Ford, The Boy Who Put The World On Wheels) and the Jaymar Specialty Co., INC is located at 800 St. Paul Street., Rochester, NY 14605. Can you tell me where this company is actually located or is this not a true Jaymar Puzzle? I bought this puzzle unopened and it appears to be some what old but not vintage?
Thank you for any help you can give me.
"HG"
***************
from Jim McW--1 August 2004:
Well, I don't know off-hand what the Rochester address is for, but Jaymar is (has been?) at several different locations, including the two others you mention.
By the way, is this the puzzle you're talking about?
Henry Ford"Henry Ford", by Norman Rockwell, JAYMARTM
We are not sure whether Jaymar is still in business. The last certain date we have for a jigsaw puzzle is 1987. However, your puzzle does appear to be a Jaymar issue.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
from "HG"--9 August 2004:
Hello again, Yes, the puzzle that you have pictured in your response to my question is the Picture of the Puzzle on the box...
I'm still wondering the approximate year of the puzzle also, if you can help me on that?
Your site is magnificent and I highly commend you for the work you have done. I have spent hours on there just looking at all the different puzzles, comparing what I have to those on your site and admiring many of the other interesting ones. Great work!!
"HG"
***************
from Jim McW--9 August 2004:
The Ford Motor Company began in 1903, so the Fiftieth Anniversary would probably have been about 1953. However, there was at least two different versions issued of this puzzle, and several different puzzles were issued commemmorating the event. Here's another:
Home Workshop Success"Home Workshop Success", by Norman Rockwell, JAYMAR.
There was also a version of your puzzle in this same, earlier series. We do not know, but we suspect that the earlier series came out in the 1950's or so, and the later puzzles were issued in the 1960's.
Thanks,
Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

This is PAGE EIGHTY-TWO of the Questions and Answers section of puzzlehistory.com.

Chris McCann's book,Master Pieces: the Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles.

   BACK to last TOUR Page

   Next TOUR Page

Copyright 2000-2010 puzzlehistory.com. All rights reserved.
Designated trademarks and brands are the property of their respective owners.